STOCKI NEWS

STOCKMAN ON BBC RADIO 4 SOUL MUSIC - DAVID BOWIE: LIFE ON MARS

Bowie Lfe On Mars

The question mark at the end of David Bowie Life On Mars? I saw it. Right there on that bright orange RCA label of the 7" vinyl single that I bought when I was 11 years old. It was so clear in my mind and answered the debate as to whether my friend Pat wanted Space Oddity or Life On Mars? played at his funeral. His wife Gloria said she was sure it was the one with the question mark. I knew immediately.

So, we played Life On Mars? and the question mark was the heart of my sermon. Questions of life. Questions in the Bible.

Little did I know that it would find me talking about Life On Mars? on Radio 4 this Saturday morning. It is part of the fantastic Soul Music series; a special edition for Bowie's birthday.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000r33c


THE CARRY FROM THE QUIET WATERS OF VACATION TO THE WHITE WATER RUSH OF VOCATION

Stocki Waves

I can only describe it as the carry of a river. My dad used to talk about the carry. It was up the river from my Granny's thatched cottage in Galgorm village. Every Sunday in my early teens my dad walked our dog up the River Maine to the carry. That carry is now in loads of wedding photos. It is on that part of the river by the luxurious Galgorm Spa and Golf Resort. 

The carry. It is where the river speeds up as it goes down over the rocks to a lower level. It is rushing, gushing, fast moving. It is where I wouldn't like to have found myself the one winter afternoon in 1991 when I decided to take to a canoe with David Stirling, Lyle Creighton and Jason McMahon! It would churn up the smooth flow of a canoe.

It is such a shift in speed and mood that I feel when I am coming out of a sabbatical rest. Post Christmas Day I went into a religious self induced detox from all things work.

I refuse to read things that might spark my preacher's imagination. I close my notebook when I start writing anything but my Best Of the Year lists. I infuriate friend when I refuse to open emails that have anything to do with what I do! 

This has been a necessity. With all out smartphones and lap tops real vacations are very hard work. So I work hard at not working... for as long as I can.

This morning though something gave. I found the joy of music and novels and TV box sets had disappeared. I felt flat. I could have done with another good day's rest but... something was bubbling... it is how the Spirit throws me back into the fray... the carry from quiet waters of vacation to the white waters of vocation. It was time to let go. It was time to go over the edge. Start paddling like a mad thing! What does God's 10:10 life in all its fulness look like for me in the next few weeks.

So, the notebook opened. The coloured pens started scrawling. The to do list. It is quite exciting, as white water rushes should be:

  • Sunday's Lectionary - Creation and Baptism. All things new!
  • Schedule worship songs for January and February.
  • Who do Janice and I need to phone and connect with pastorally.
  • Start looking ahead at 2021 and how Fitzroy will look in the last weeks of lockdown and then in the opening up again.
  • 4 Corners Festival programme. Writing the introduction.
  • Starting to shape the Evening With Duke Special for 4 Corners Festival. very exciting!
  • Start sketching ideas for BBC Radio 2 Pause For Thoughts.
  • Get back to finishing Pope Francis new book Let Us Dream for a review I have been asked to write. 
  • Write an endorsement for Gary Burnett's book, based on his Paul In ten series in Fitzroy.

Oh it is exciting. I cannot wait to get started in the morning... who am I kidding... the notebook is already opened. Bring on the rush. Let's paddle!

 

 


PERSONAL REVIEW OF 2020 - SECOND, THE BAD NEWS...

Lucia

It is a process that I am not sure if I have fully processed. Three months into Coronavirus lockdown and I found myself in hospital. It was sudden. A painful night between June 3rd and 4th I had put down to heart burn and a very bad choice of film in the family’s Movie A Night In Lockdown. Blame the boredom of Queen Of The Desert.

It was not funny though. What I thought was heartburn was excruciatingly painful. A night of no sleep whatever and Janice had me off to the doctor who sent me to A & E. This was an A & E with seats X-ed out. Social distant queues to get into wards. 24 hours of tests and I was now in a side ward having antibiotics pumped through and the mention of a gallbladder removal, maybe the first gallbladder operation since theatre started opening up again. That was the blessing.

It was a short sharp shock of a process. Yet so much of the year was tied up in those days.

The afternoon before my gallbladder started giving me pain we had sat through the online funeral of our dearest friend Lucia Quinney Mee. Lucia was a gifted and inspirational young woman who left us just a few days before her 21st birthday. Here and her sister Alice were soul mates with our girls. The first half of our year was praying and being touch with Lucia's family. She had had her fourth liver transplant in the last hours of 2019 and we were aware that recovery could be long. 

Janice and Jasmine had gotten in to Kings Hospital to see her at the end of February and I read her dad David’s diaries from the ICU like  daily devotions. Lucia and her family were in prime location to watch Covid-19 take hold. Being the Quinney Mees we sensed them being a vital quiet contribution to that community at a crucial time.

By mid May we sensed that all was not well and were devastated when Lucia made the brave move to not put her weary body through any more. Our grief was only more acute by the distance and not being able to be with them all and that there was no funeral in Ballycastle. Without doubt when we look back at 2020 it will be Lucia and not Coronavirus that will hold our memory. We continue to grieve.

It was Lucia’s father David that I looked to in my own early fears in A & E. His advice about befriending the doctors and nurses and letting them hunt for me was my mantra all the way through. 

There was more. In my first few hours in A & E, as I struggled to stay awake, a text came in from Fr Martin Magill to tell me that our friend Glenn Jordan had passed away. Glenn was younger than me and much fitter. This was a stunning shock. Glenn was a founding member of the 4 Corners Festival and a week before lockdown we had chatted in the street about a coffee after all this was over. Every time I hear the new Springsteen album or watch Leeds United in the Premiership…

As I sat there I realised that as I suffered through the night in pain, Glenn was dying suddenly in bed.  I thought about Glenn’s family now devastated in grief. Mine were worried at home unable to visit but they knew I was in good hands with a solution imminent.

Glenn’s death in June was followed later in the year by Jay Swartzendruber and Derek Hall’s. Both were younger still. Snuffed out suddenly. Jay was a musical loving buddy and Derek and I had worked on various TEAR Fund campaigns. We schemed to bring the Kingdom and laughed a lot as we did. Never mind Coronavirus, 2020 was a bleak year even without it. My own mortality started having conversations with me.

In those few days in hospital I feel I got a snap shot of the medical challenges of 2020. Watching the extra vigilance, commitments and compassion of the staff. Seeing long term patients struggle without the visits of loved ones. One man in my ward had to make a tough decision as to whether to go to a side ward so that he would be isolated enough to see his wife once a week or forsake seeing his wife to have the every day company of the ward.

For me there was added stress in my awareness of the virus. I knew there was an added risk to having the operation. Tougher was that isolation from family. I had a minor operation in 2019 and Janice was the rock before it and right there after the operation to see me out of it. This time it was a solo run and dependence on face time, phone calls, texts and social media. All such communications of course found a little more respect in 2020. 

I believe that the sickness and grief is where Coronavirus hit us hardest. What are always tough times in life suddenly were made even tougher. Not being able to be beside loved ones in their sickness or even as they pass away and not having support there as you grieve loved ones. That is the real hurt of this virus.

Into such I have attempted to suggest one word. Emmanuel. Praying for friends and Fitzroy that they would know in those moments when isolated kept people apart a God who is always there. Emmanuel - God with us. And with those we loved and love.


PERSONAL REVIEW OF 2020 - FIRST THE GOOD NEWS...

Stocki and Gary Lightbody

(my review of 2020... there is good news and bad news... first the good...)

 

2020 started well. The 4 Corners Festival was a good one. I got to interview both Ken Haddock and Gary Lightbody to full houses in Fitzroy. Both were powerful evenings. I am not quick to give myself positive reviews but I was so pleased with the interview with Gary. We had never met. We were quickly at ease. My respect for him as human being grew even more. It went exactly as I dreamed it would and people seemed to enjoy it.

This is what I had wanted to do in my teens. Journalism but not just the written kind. I wanted to be Bob Harris, John Peel and Lester Bangs all rolled into one.

I guess in a strange way I got to be all three and added pastor as well. Of course the pastor is the main bit. The others are just hobbies though I am vocationally thrilled that those hobbies have fed into the main roll.

Yes, this year I got to do all my regular journalistic stuff and more. I still feel blessed to be doing regular Pause For Thoughts with Vanessa Feltz on BBC Radio 2 and Thought For The Days on BBC Radio Ulster. I also loved contributions to Radio Ulster about Van Morrison and John Lennon and a soon to be aired contribution on BBC Radio 4 about David Bowie.

As well as all the radio stuff I got to do some writing this year. There was the poem in the 4 Corners Festival poetry book Building A City Of Grace as well as an article in Freckle magazine. Since  Coronavirus started Fr Martin Magill and I have been writing a Christian weekly column in the Belfast Telegraph.

Best of all was the publishing, at long last, of the book I have been privileged to be involved in for the past three years. 2020 was all about meticulous editing and cover design. It is now wonderful to know that people are reading Trevor Stevenson’s memoir, From Killing Fields to Fields of Life, about founding Fields Of Life. Some are even saying nice things!

All of this happened around a year when my journalistic leanings became an actual part of my ministry. Oh I have always felt that my vocation was wider than being a preacher and pastor but this year more than ever my journalism narrowed into the preaching.

Coronavirus sent church life on its head. Suddenly we were not able to gather as a congregation and very soon we related that this wasn’t just for a week or two. Congregational services had to go on line. We had to do what could not be done but get as close to it as we could - keeping a community together while they watched in their homes alone. 

I realised that if ever the Biblical text had to caress and collide with the contemporary context it was 2020. I was constantly seeking God for what I call “grace and imagination”. The services in worship, prayers, songs, sermons and other additions had to build resilience and give hope, as well as the challenge of being disciples through tis unique time. 

This is where God had pre-blessed me with all my previous journalism experience. Radio shows, Melvyn Bragg panel shows on the South Bank, live Sky News interviews about U2, U2 documentaries, putting together radio shows. All of that gave me experience that I needed to get to work with. How to relate to a camera and what worked a screen as opposed to a building.

I was even more blessed to have a techie team in Fitzroy who had the skills but also quickly work out the equipment needed, the programmes needed and the deep gladness to do it.

Add to this musical families who could record worship songs from their own homes as well as prayers and readers in abundance and we were in a very fortunate place to deal with the Coronavirus challenge.

As well as reaching Fitzroy we were able to stretch out across the world and find regulars from north west Canada to Australia and so many places in between. We were able to add video work and original songs ( I got to write a few with Jonny Fitch and Gareth Black) and a brilliant series on the apostle Paul by Gary Burnett called Paul In Ten. Gary’s series will be published as a book in 2021. 

If I look across 2020 and look for a sense of vocational satisfaction, there are many places to find joy. The best one though came around Christmas time from a member of the congregation. It read, “Ironically this was a year when we could have been most disconnected as a church family and yet I feel the opposite”. 

Whatever Janice and I attempted to do in this bizarre year that was our aim. I am sure we didn’t hold everyone in but the response suggests we did alright. Now we need to ask how to reach deeper and higher and wider in 2021.


MY FOREWORD FOR FROM KILLING FIELDS TO FIELDS OF LIFE

Me and Trevor

(This is my foreword from Trevor Stevenson's memoir that I have co-written with him. This gives you a flavour of why I was excited to be involved in the project.)

 

It was a hot day, under a blue African sky. I was attempting to find shade beneath the canvas of a gazebo, a bottle of water in my hand. All Ugandan protocol was being observed.

It was my turn to speak. I looked across the grounds of Onialeku Primary School on the edge of the town of Arua, on the edge of north west Uganda. Out beyond the mango tree was a brand new shiny building that would soon house the school that had started in the church to the other side of me and makeshift building behind me. I was speaking at the opening ceremony.

It was soul tingling. Oh, it was just a building but it was so much more than a building. It was the possibility of changed lives. It had the potential to transform a community. It was the building of hope, tangibly before my eyes.

Fitzroy Church, where I am minister, had taken a decision to tithe the funding for our Church Halls project. Of course, tithing the cost of a building means raising ten percent extra as the builders are never best pleased when you take ten percent off their bill and send it to Africa. A process was carried out that linked us with Onialeku Primary School. With that tithe, we funded a new primary school building in two blocks.

Fitzroy had sent a team of young people, led by my wife Janice and I, to meet the children, staff and parents of Onialeku Primary School and to be at the school opening ceremony. We had fallen in love. Within a short space of time Fitzroy members would be sponsoring over 60 of the children sitting in front of me now. We would be travelling back with teams for years to come, sharing mutual poverty and wealth, finding God’s presence in the mingling. 

I was elated to be here. I had Bishop Isaac beside me. One Sunday in church, as he watched all the children running around his feet, he had asked God what he could do for them. “Education”, he sensed God reply. So they started a makeshift school. It grew and when a fit for purpose building was needed, he connected with Fields of Life in Kampala. The Northern Ireland and Kampala offices of Fields of Life had bonded the two communities of Fitzroy and Onialeku.

To eventually be in Arua was incredibly emotional. I cried as we entered the town, I cried when I got off the bus in the school, I cried when I walked through the doors of the new building. I cried as I made my speech at the opening.

In the speech I unpacked the Biblical basis for what Fields of Life does. They have three aims in their branding. Changing people. I spoke of the cross and how Jesus redeems us. Transforming communities. I spoke of the incarnation and how the Word of God, in Jesus, becomes flesh and moves into our neighbourhoods. I spoke of the hope of resurrection. It seemed that personal change, community transformation and hope were all around me.

I had moved on to my “thanks yous” when I said it. I am not sure if it was in my notes or not but I said something like, “Today I would like to thank Trevor Stevenson. Trevor came over to Uganda in the 90s and somehow God led him to begin Fields of Life and build over 100 schools like this one. I would love to get to know that story better.”

Looking back, it was as if God was listening in and turned to some of his angels and said, “Let’s make that happen. Our story with Trevor needs told. If Stockman really wants to know that story, let’s get him to help write it.”

So, for the last two years I have read, listened, edited and done some of the writing of Trevor’s story. What a privilege it has been. What a blessing. On sabbatical in 2018 I travelled around Uganda with Trevor visiting some of the important sites in this book. I then got to spend some weeks in Kampala and Arua, editing and writing.

I learned about Uganda, the geography, people and customs. I learned about Fields of Life, its development and impact not only in East African but in churches, like mine, whose mission was transformed by missional partnerships.  

Most of all I learned what it is to follow Jesus one step at a time. I came to respect Trevor’s openness to the leading of God and his courage to take the next step. Just the next step. Trevor had no grand plan or vision in 1993. Schools were not even on his radar. This memoir is a remarkable story of God’s leading and a disciple listening and being courageous enough to follow. 

Spending so much time in Trevor’s life was like bring on a discipleship retreat, every page inspiring me to believe what God could to do with a seemingly most ordinary person if he or she or I would take just the next step. 

I am definitely glad I asked to hear the story!

 

ORDER ON LINE FROM FIELDS OF LIFE

If you know me then I have some at home... £10


I HAVE WRITTEN A BOOK YOU WANT FOR CHRISTMAS!!!

Book-e1605095733375-600x494

It was three years ago this weekend that I met up with Trevor Stevenson to discuss helping him write his memoir. At last, after three long years we are about to go to print and you can have From Killing Fields To Fields Of Life in your hands before Christmas!

In the Foreword to the book I tell the story of when I first said that I wanted to hear Trevor’s story. In August 2015, I was in Arua in north west Uganda, speaking at the opening of Onialeku Primary School. Fitzroy had funded a school building and we had partnered with Onialeku through Fields of Life.

As I wondered about all that had to happen in order that I would have the privilege to see this building and be somehow involved in it I took the story back to the beginning of Fields Of Life. A man leaving Ireland in 1993 set all this in motion. I had an urge to know how that came about.

Maybe God was listening and fancied a laugh. Maybe I was involved in Trevor’s story telling already and God hadn’t yet let me know. Whatever… at Halloween in 2017 I sat across from Trevor in a Bray hotel and agreed to help him write that story.

What a privilege it has been. When I get involved in an organisation, in the way Fitzroy did with Fields Of Life, I commit. I want to know everything. I want to get as involved as I can. Over the last three years, as I have worked on this book I have felt privileged to have spent time in both the Lisburn and Kampala offices, got to know all of the staff and got to visit some of the crucial places in the story of the organisation.

After that meeting with Trevor in 2017, I was privileged to travel to the Teachers’ Conference in Mukona in January 2018, be there for the 25th Anniversary celebrations of Fields Of Life, before spending a week travelling with Trevor around Uganda, even up to Karamoja for the cutting of the ground for a new school funded by Fields of Life Alumni.

In June of that same year I took a sabbatical and travelled to Uganda to work on the book. Trevor sent me 130,000 words. I had to cut it in half, shape it and make it gripping. As someone who always dreamed of being a writer I was in my element. Every day, Janice, Caitlin and Jasmine would go off and work with Fields Of Life, visiting schools etc. Jasmine did her School placement in the Child Sponsorship department. I would sit in the apartment beside the office and scribble and type. 

We headed north to Arua and I continued to shape. It was so poignant writing chapters about the northern part of Uganda, actually there in the areas that it happened. We drove through Luwero. That is where Trevor’s Ugandan story began. The Luwero Triangle was known in recent Ugandan history as The Killing Fields. Trevor wanted to transform them into Fields Of Life.

Books take time. They take longer when none of those involved are professionals. After the sabbatical I did not have the time to concentrate on a book. Trevor runs a church too. Then there are professional editors and designers and printers never mind a few lawyers. Oxford commas!

I think it is worth the time and the wait. There is drama. Lots of drama. There is terrorism, bombs, crash landings, a financial scandal, suspected Ebola, an Irish President Mary McAleese landing in a helicopter in the middle of nowhere and the President of Burundi coming to Hillsborough Castle after a throwaway invitation!  

There is vocational wrestling, cultural adaption, spiritual discernment and organisational development. There is dancing and tears, fears and prayer, loyalty and betrayal. There is a stuttering beginning and a 25 year celebration that reveals the incredible  impact of Fields Of Life across East Africa - hundreds of thousands of children educated and three quarters of a million people given the gift of clean water.

Trevor’s story is the first chapter in Fields Of Life’s story. Above and underneath is the story of God using one ordinary man and his wife Ruth to do extraordinary things. It is a book about discipleship, vocation and mission.

Before becoming an Anglican minister Trevor had grown up a farmer. One day resting on a hay bale he had the chat with his dad about maybe leaving the farm and giving his life to the ministry. As I sat with Trevor at the 25th Anniversary Celebrations in Mukono I leaned over and suggested that the story of Fields Of Life’s impact on lives, communities and indeed nations was a harvest that no farmer could ever even dream of. “From hay bales to hallelujahs," I said. We laughed and thankfully it remained a joke rather than the title of the book! 

I have some books if you would like to call and pick one up... £10

Or you can order it online FIELDS OF LIFE SHOP


STOCKMAN ON THE RADIO - FOR WEEKS!!!

Stocki in Beeb

In the morning I begin an 8 weeks of Thoughts For The Day and Pause for Thought. With a wee John Lennon interview thrown in.

Tomorrow is second in my run of 4 Thoughts for the Day on Good Morning Ulster on BBC Radio Ulster. That of course includes Christmas morning! My love for the riches of the Christmas story will pour out. Tomorrow... In the surreal disconcerting times there is a woman in the nativity story that we might need to be following.

After my John Lennon chatter on last week's Sunday Sequence iw ill be back on the show on December 20th talking about Christmas.

In the new year I will be on BBC Radio 2 doing Pause For Thought on Vanessa Feltz’ very early wrong show. I will again be on on Fridays, from January 22nd to February 12th.

See you all there!


LEAD (From Killing Fields To Fields Of Life)

FOL Book Cover

LEAD

Lead

Rips flesh

Death

page2image1105792 page2image32636112
 
 
 
page2image32633648
page2image32631408
 
Lead
 
Colours paper
 
Life
 
 
Books are about more than the chapters. Titles and cover concepts can be a conundrum after the writing is done. That was no different with From Killing Fields To Fields Of Life that I co-wrote with Trevor Stevenson.
 
We wondered if Killing Fields in the title would bring thoughts of Cambodia? Would the very clever cover by Thought Collective be understood?
 
As we sat in the Thought Collective office marvelling at the cover I jotted this down. It is the thesis of the book in eight words!
 
 

FRIDAY THE 13th...

Stocki Fri 13th

Photo: Gordon Ashbridge: my installation in Fitzroy, Friday the 13th of November 2009

 

Today is Friday the 13th. Some are superstitious. When I started visiting in the Ballycraigy estate in Antrim during my assistantship in First Antrim I kept missing houses and then realised that the entire estate had no number 13s! 

The following poem was originally written on a Mission Team where we felt that God had blown away any superstitions! 

I then preached for Fitzroy on Sunday 13th of September 2009 and was installed on Friday 13th of November. I updated the poem. It was a Friday the 13th blessing...

 

Friday the 13th

Superstition lies dying

Overthrown and vanquished

Hear it, feebly crying

The unbelievable made believable

What can never be has been

Our spirits dance in wonder

At the phenomena we've seen

Exploring galaxies of grammar

In a quest to pierce through

To define the indefinable

The transcendence of you

In a shiveree of silence

On this earth's thinnest place

Friday the 13th's blessing

An interuption of grace.


I HAVE A NEW BOOK OUT FOR CHRISTMAS - FROM THE KILLING FIELDS TO FIELDS OF LIFE

Stocki in Fitzroy Room

This photo was taken by Janice. It is July 2018 and I am working on the book in Pastor David Emazu's office in Arua, Uganda.

 

It was three years ago this weekend that I met up with Trevor Stevenson to discuss helping him write his memoir. At last, after three long years we are about to go to print and you can have From Killing Fields To Fields Of Life in your hands before Christmas!

In the Foreword to the book I tell the story of when I first said that I wanted to hear Trevor’s story. In August 2015, I was in Arua in north west Uganda, speaking at the opening of Onialeku Primary School. Fitzroy had funded a school building and we had partnered with Onialeku through Fields of Life.

As I wondered about all that had to happen in order that I would have the privilege to see this building and be somehow involved in it I took the story back to the beginning of Fields Of Life. A man leaving Ireland in 1993 set all this in motion. I had an urge to know how that came about.

Maybe God was listening and fancied a laugh. Maybe I was involved in Trevor’s story telling already and God hadn’t yet let me know. Whatever… at Halloween in 2017 I sat across from Trevor in a Bray hotel and agreed to help him write that story.

What a privilege it has been. When I get involved in an organisation, in the way Fitzroy did with Fields Of Life, I commit. I want to know everything. I want to get as involved as I can. Over the last three years, as I have worked on this book I have felt privileged to have spent time in both the Lisburn and Kampala offices, got to know all of the staff and got to visit some of the crucial places in the story of the organisation.

After that meeting with Trevor in 2017, I was privileged to travel to the Teachers’ Conference in Mukona in January 2018, be there for the 25th Anniversary celebrations of Fields Of Life, before spending a week travelling with Trevor around Uganda, even up to Karamoja for the cutting of the ground for a new school funded by Fields of Life Alumni.

In June of that same year I took a sabbatical and travelled to Uganda to work on the book. Trevor sent me 130,000 words. I had to cut it in half, shape it and make it gripping. As someone who always dreamed of being a writer I was in my element. Every day, Janice, Caitlin and Jasmine would go off and work with Fields Of Life, visiting schools etc. Jasmine did her School placement in the Child Sponsorship department. I would sit in the apartment beside the office and scribble and type. 

We headed north to Arua and I continued to shape. It was so poignant writing chapters about the northern part of Uganda, actually there in the areas that it happened. We drove through Luwero. That is where Trevor’s Ugandan story began. The Luwero Triangle was known in recent Ugandan history as The Killing Fields. Trevor wanted to transform them into Fields Of Life.

Books take time. They take longer when none of those involved are professionals. After the sabbatical I did not have the time to concentrate on a book. Trevor runs a church too. Then there are professional editors and designers and printers never mind a few lawyers. Oxford commas!

I think it is worth the time and the wait. There is drama. Lots of drama. There is terrorism, bombs, crash landings, a financial scandal, suspected Ebola, an Irish President Mary McAleese landing in a helicopter in the middle of nowhere and the President of Burundi coming to Hillsborough Castle after a throwaway invitation!  

There is vocational wrestling, cultural adaption, spiritual discernment and organisational development. There is dancing and tears, fears and prayer, loyalty and betrayal. There is a stuttering beginning and a 25 year celebration that reveals the incredible  impact of Fields Of Life across East Africa - hundreds of thousands of children educated and three quarters of a million people given the gift of clean water.

Trevor’s story is the first chapter in Fields Of Life’s story. Above and underneath is the story of God using one ordinary man and his wife Ruth to do extraordinary things. It is a book about discipleship, vocation and mission.

Before becoming an Anglican minister Trevor had grown up a farmer. One day resting on a hay bale he had the chat with his dad about maybe leaving the farm and giving his life to the ministry. As I sat with Trevor at the 25th Anniversary Celebrations in Mukono I leaned over and suggested that the story of Fields Of Life’s impact on lives, communities and indeed nations was a harvest that no farmer could ever even dream of. “From hay bales to hallelujahs," I said. We laughed and thankfully it remained a joke rather than the title of the book! 

 

I have some books if you would like to call and pick one up... £10

Or you can order it online FIELDS OF LIFE SHOP